D 18M 8 - 2014

D 18M 8 - 2014

D 18M 8 - 2014

basedgosh:

a national hero

basedgosh:

a national hero

(Source: goodassdog, via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

pussyp0ptart:

This is important ya’ll need to reblog it

pussyp0ptart:

This is important ya’ll need to reblog it

(Source: ambiguousgenitalia, via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

 An Isochrone curve is the curve for which the time taken by an object sliding without friction in uniform gravity to its lowest point is independent of its starting point. The curve is a cycloid, and the time is equal to π times the square root of the radius over the acceleration of gravity.
- A ball set on an Isocrone (or Tautochrone) curve will reach the bottom at the same length of time no matter where you place the ball, so long as there is no impeding friction.
[Gif] - Four balls slide down a cycloid curve from different positions, but they arrive at the bottom at the same time. The blue arrows show the points’ acceleration along the curve. On the top is the time-position diagram.
[source]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

 An Isochrone curve is the curve for which the time taken by an object sliding without friction in uniform gravity to its lowest point is independent of its starting point. The curve is a cycloid, and the time is equal to π times the square root of the radius over the acceleration of gravity.

- A ball set on an Isocrone (or Tautochrone) curve will reach the bottom at the same length of time no matter where you place the ball, so long as there is no impeding friction.

[Gif] - Four balls slide down a cycloid curve from different positions, but they arrive at the bottom at the same time. The blue arrows show the points’ acceleration along the curve. On the top is the time-position diagram.

[source]

D 18M 8 - 2014

mark-helsing:

WHENEVER YOU SEE THIS POST ON YOUR DASH, STOP WHAT YOU’RE DOING AND WRITE ONE SENTENCE FOR YOUR CURRENT PROJECT.

Just one sentence. Stop blogging for one minute and write a single sentence. It could be dialogue, it could be a nice description of scenery, it could be a metaphor, I don’t care. The point is, do it. Then, when you finish, you can get back to blogging.

If this gets viral, you might just have your novel finished by next Tuesday.

(via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

kingshezza:

finding fanfiction i haven’t read yet

image

(via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

thestudentprincesss:

barefootdramaturg:

jewlesthemagnificent:

oldtobegin:

velveteenrabbit:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

2,000 notes.

JERKING OFF TO THIS

OH GOD LESS VERSUS FEWER THANK YOU FOR ACKNOWLEDGING MY PERSONAL GRAMMATICAL VENDETTA.

By accident. On purpose. Never on accident.

ALSO, ‘amount’ and ‘number’ follow the same rules as ‘less’ and ‘fewer’, respectively. it’s not an ‘amount’ of people, it’s a number of people; by contrast, it IS an ‘amount of water’, etc.

(via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

superwhovenging:

capslockapocalypse:

alyssaaraee:

EVERYONE STOP AND REALIZE !! THIS IS A BABY FOX!!!

*softly in baby talk* wa pa pa pa pa pa pow

*softly in baby talk*  ring ding ding ding ding ding 

(via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.
For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.
Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.
In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,
Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study. 
This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave. 
image via NPR

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.

For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.

Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.

In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,


Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study.

This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave.

image via NPR

(via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

shadowrawrs:

strawberrydaydreams:

do you ever hate someone so much but you don’t even have a valid reason

you’re just like

no

And then they give you a reason and its like

image

(via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

cockyvonmurdertits:

aubrophonia:

THIS IS SO COOL

worth reading 10/10 fucked me up

(Source: famiry, via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014

D 18M 8 - 2014

coelasquid:

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

some cool sites in there.

(via sophielostandfound)

D 18M 8 - 2014